Culture World

10 Women who Outdid Famous Men

Sexism and misogyny was very common in the past. Women’s contribution to society had often been diminished and overlooked in the past. Women who outdid men in the past rarely got any acknowledgement for their achievements. Here are ten supporting cases:

10. Sybil Ludington vs Paul Revere
Source: modernnotion.com

Source: modernnotion.com

When Sybil Ludington was only 16 years old she heard that the British were attacking a nearby town of Danbury. She saddled up her horse and rode off into the night. She gathered the local militia and raced from farm to farm while rapping on doors with a long stick to arouse the occupants. She refused to allow the militia to rest or obtain refreshments and persuaded them to ride off immediately. Ludington rode 65km that night and wasn’t captured. She gathered 400 militiamen to engage in battle at Ridgefield. She was personally thanked by George Washington.

Paul Revere is famous for riding his horse from place to place to warn people about the arrival of British soldiers before the battles of Lexington and Concord. He was arrested shortly after he left Lexington and his journey covered half of what Sybil Ludington rode. His companion, Samuel Prescott, managed to escape and make it all the way to Concord. His heroics were incredibly important but a bid dim against Sybil’s defeat.

9. Sayyida Al-Hurra vs Blackbeard
Source: pictorial.jezebel.com

Source: pictorial.jezebel.com

Sayyida al-Hurra, also known as the Pirate Queen, was never as famous as Blackbeard, who never controlled more than two ships and a few hundred pirates. Sayyiada’s family was forced to leave Spain when the Muslim kingdom of Granada was conquered by Ferdinand and Isabella. She established herself in Morocco and soon rose to become the ruler of the city of Tetouan, which she turned into a hub for pirate raids against Christian Spain and Portugal.Sayyida dominated the Western. Her ships launched raids on Spain, ransoming captives and selling the rest into slavery. She married the Sultan of Morocco and ruled Tetouan for 30 years.

Blackbeard is considered an infamous buccaneer. He operated from a base in the Bahamas where he terrorized the Caribbean. Blackbeard or Edwin Teach which was his real name, died dramatically in hand-to-hand combat with a pirate hunter. His career as a pirate lasted less than a year but he continues to live on in fiction tales.

8. Babe Ruth vs. Jackie Mitchell
Source: www.smithsonianmag.com

Source: www.smithsonianmag.com

Jackie Mitchell was one of the first professional female baseball players in 1931. Her career didn’t last long as her contract was voided after a few days. Most rumor that her contract was voided because women playing baseball was disgraceful in the eyes of baseball commissioner Kennesaw Mountain Landis. She still made history by striking out two of the greatest players in history, Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig, in the same day. She also went on tour with the famed House of David religious baseball teams.

7. Jocelyn Bell Burnell vs. Anthony Hewish
Source: www.iflscience.com

Source: www.iflscience.com

Jocelyn Bell Burrell was the first one who noticed and discovered signals emitted by distant quasars. She concluded that there were a number of mysterious, regular radio pulses. She reported her discovery to Anthony Hewish and Martin Ryle who initially investigated it thinking it was “Little Green Men” Through more research they discovered that it was pulses emitted from a previously undiscovered type of rotating neutron star. It was a huge breakthrough in astrophysics and Anthony Hewish and Martin Ryle received the Noble Prize in Physics for it. The Nobel committee did not see fit to honor Bell even though she was the first person to detect pulsars.

6. Zelda Fitzgeraldvs F. Scott Fitzgerald
Source: www.theguardian.com

Source: www.theguardian.com

Scott Fitzgerald was remembered as one of the great American novelists while the brilliant Zelda remained obscure. Their marriage was not a happy one as Fitzgerald was constantly accusing Zelda of having affairs while he himself had countless mistresses. He even invited one of his mistress and mother to visit them and would compare them to Zelda. He mocked her lack of drive while refusing to allow her to pursue any passions. Some rumor that Fitzgerald only married Zelda so he could draw inspiration from her.

It was said that Scott would carry bits of paper to write down clever things Zelda said so he could use it in his books. He stole a passage from her journal and used it in one of his books. And even though he was copying his wife’s work he was constantly portraying her as insane to family and friends. He even admitted in a journal that he was aiming at pushing her towards a nervous breakdown.

5. Maurice Wilkinsvs Rosalind Franklin
Source:www.bbc.co.uk

Source:www.bbc.co.uk

Rosalind Franklin was a researcher in chemistry. She used X-ray diffractions to take clear images of DNA fibers. The techniques that Franklin pioneered were crucial in determining the structure of DNA. Franklin and Wilkins were colleagues but had a strained relationship. In 1953 Wilkins secretly showed one of Franklin’s images to James Watson and Francis Crick, who used the image to develop their famous model of DNA.

The breakthrough was announced in the journal Nature and future Franklin’s part in the discovery last. Franklin became good friends with Crick and Watson but her relationship with Wilkins never bettered. She left King’s College for Birkbeck College where she did pioneering work on the structure of RNA. Crck, Watson and Wilkins shared the Nobel Prize for medicine in 1962, leaving Franklin out.

4. Yoko Ono vs. John Lennon
Source:www.billboard.com

Source:www.billboard.com

Yoko Ono was seven years older than John Lennon. She had strong memories of the Second World War and the surge of pacifist thinking that emerged in Japan during 1950. Yoko was drawn to the Dadaist movement which sought to shock the word into realizing the futility of war through bizarre and unusual art.

She had more influence on John than vice versa by inspiring some of the couple’s most famous stunts including the “bed-in for peace” and their sponsorship of billboards reading “War Is Over! If You Want It.” She was always more political than John and her activism provided Lennon with a sense of purpose. She did not deserve to be the butt of jokes for everyone who was angry that her marriage “broke up the Beatles.”

3. Elizabeth Magie vs. Charles Darrow
Source:www.theguardian.com

Source:www.theguardian.com

agiefiled patent for her “Landlord’s Game” in 1903, some 30 years before Charles Darrow filed his own patent for “Monopoly.” Magie’s game came with two sets of rules one which rewarded all pears and another version in which the goal was to take all the other player’s money. It also included fake money and a “Go To Jail” space. Magie’s game became popular among college students but eventually flailed to find widespread popularity.

Darrow was familiar with Magie’s game and modified it and resold it to Parker Brothers. Barker Brothers contacted Magie and arranged to buy her patent for a small fee. The Parkers began publishing a dramatic story of Darrow saying his family from poverty by inventing the game from scratch.

2. Ada Lovelace vs. Charles Babbage
Source: www.techweekeurope.co.uk43

Source: www.techweekeurope.co.uk43

Lovelace was a good friend with Charles Babbage, inventor of the first programmable computer. In 1842 Babbage asked her to translate an Italian lecture on the subject of his Analytical Engine. She spent nine months working on the translation and added extensive notes which were three times as long as the lecture. These notes cemented her reputation as the mother of computer programming.

It is plain that Lovelace had a clearer understanding of the potential of computers while Babbage conceived his computers as tools for mathematical calculations. She was the first to realize that computers could process any data representable by numbers.

1. Anne RoyallvsEvery Male Journalist
Source: www.interesteng.org

Source: www.interesteng.org

Anne Royall started her own Washington newspaper in 1831 when she was already 62 years old. Her finest hour came when she came across president John Quincy Adams swimming nude in the Potomac. She quickly seized the initiative by sitting down on his clothes and refusing to budge until he consented to an interview. She became the first female reporter to interview a sitting president. She eventually published interviews with every sitting president from Quincy Adams to Franklin Pierce and even Abraham Lincoln when he was just a humble congressman.